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Elisce's Story (I CAN Work Project)

Elisce's Story (I CAN Work Project)

I spoke to Elisce on the phone on a dismal Friday morning. She was upbeat and confident. Her voice was strong and she had lots of positives to say about her situation. This was not always the case. Elisce has had to overcome anxiety and confidence issues to get to this point. The support she has received from the ‘I CAN Work' scheme has been essential, both on a practical level and in terms of emotional support. "They helped me get my interview, and then got me to Liverpool for training. It was the first time I'd been away from home, and there I was, on my own, in a hotel room in the middle of a city, surrounded by people I don't know. But my I CAN Work key contact was always at the end of the phone. I was not on my own. She gave me lots of reassurance and confidence. I always had someone to reach out to by phone or email, if I needed it."

 

Elisce is now working for a telecommunications company in an office administration role. She likes the team she works with and is more than capable of doing her job. She was unhappy in her previous company, and her counsellor at the time referred her to I CAN Work. She says she was surprised how quick the process was to set up and was impressed with the people she met from I CAN Work. "They all seem to know how to support you in the right way. I spoke a lot at our first meeting, they were getting to know my background and me as a person; they took my experience into consideration." RCS are now setting up free counselling for Elisce outside of work to continue to build her self-belief and overcome her anxieties. "The support I get from my key contact at RCS is amazing. I can't fault her. She is always there for me. Thank you."

 

I CAN Work helps people with mild-moderate mental health problems to find and remain in employment to support their recovery and improve their wellbeing. The programme, which is the first of its kind in Wales, is delivered by Betsi Cadwaladar University Health Board, in partnership with CAIS and the Rhyl City Strategy, with funding from the Welsh Government.